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August 2022

Episode: KPN 27-08-2022

Kaladan Radio August 27, 2022 377 4


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The military council condemned the international statements on the 5th anniversary of the Rohingya ‘Genocide Remembrance Day’

On the anniversary of the Genocide that occurred in Rakhine State on August 25, 2017, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Myanmar Military Council issued a statement on August 25 that it strongly condemned the statements made by some countries and organizations, including the spokesperson of the United Nations Secretary-General.

Thousands of Rohingya refugees held “Genocide Remembrance Day” rallies on Thursday across a huge network of camps in Bangladesh, marking five years since fleeing a military offensive in Myanmar. In August 2017 around 750,000 of the mostly Muslim minority streamed over the border with mainly Buddhist Myanmar to escape the onslaught, which is now the subject of a landmark genocide case at the UN’s top court.

Large-scale sanctions against Myanmar’s government officials by influential countries are necessary to put pressure on Myanmar, they said at a seminar titled “Rohingya Crisis: The Pathways to Repatriation” organised by the Centre for Genocide Studies at the Foreign Service Academy auditorium in Dhaka University on Thursday.

Presenting the keynote address, the Director of the Centre for Genocide Studies of Dhaka University and Professor of International Relations Department Dr Imtaz Ahmed said, “It is high time to talk about the return of Rohingyas. They will not live in Bangladesh only; other countries will also have to take responsibility.”

“It is high time to talk about the return of Rohingyas. They will not live in Bangladesh only; other countries will also have to take responsibility. To increase pressure on the Myanmar government, large-scale international sanctions should be imposed on their officials. The US has sanctioned only 22 Myanmar government officials. Influential countries, including the Western ones, should expand the scope of this ban and the international community is not playing a very strong role; they don’t have a headache. With the help of Japan, China and India, a few shelters will be built in the Rakhine state, and there is no reason for the Rohingyas to depend on that. The traces of negative elements remain in Myanmar. “

Professor of International Relations Department Dr Imtaz Ahmed

“To increase pressure on the Myanmar government, large-scale international sanctions should be imposed on their officials. The US has sanctioned only 22 Myanmar government officials. Influential countries, including the Western ones, should expand the scope of this ban,” he said.

“The international community is not playing a very strong role; they don’t have a headache. With the help of Japan, China and India, a few shelters will be built in the Rakhine state, and there is no reason for the Rohingyas to depend on that. The traces of negative elements remain in Myanmar,” Dr Imtiaz Ahmed added.

On the five-year mark of the forced mass displacement of Rohingya from Myanmar’s Rakhine State, Bangladesh continues to show “great generosity and leadership” in hosting refugees, which requires renewed international attention and equitable burden-sharing by countries in the region and beyond and we cannot let this become a forgotten crisis, said the United Nations Special Envoy on Myanmar Noeleen Heyzer in a statement who also attended the seminar.

“I will continue to advocate for greater leadership of countries in the region in supporting Bangladesh and leveraging their influence with Myanmar to create conducive conditions for the voluntary, safe and dignified return of refugees,” she added.

Foreign Minister AK Abdul Momen reiterated Dhaka’s call for smooth repatriation of the Rohingyas to their place of origin in Rakhine State ending their plights and miseries.Bangladesh is also talking to Myanmar on good faith as Myanmar has expressed its willingness for repatriation of the Rohingyas.

The signatories are Australian High Commission in Dhaka, British High Commission, High Commission of Canada, Embassy of Denmark, European Union Delegation to Bangladesh, Embassy of France, German Embassy, Embassy of Italy, Kingdom of the Netherlands Embassy, Royal Norwegian Embassy, Embassy of Spain, Embassy of Sweden, Embassy of Switzerland and Embassy of the United States of America in Bangladesh.

The foreign missions in their joint statement said they will continue to work together with the Government of Bangladesh, the UN, and international and national partners, to ensure that Rohingya refugees receive humanitarian assistance, protection and education.

“They will continue to work together with the Government of Bangladesh, the UN, and international and national partners, to ensure that Rohingya refugees receive humanitarian assistance, protection and education. We underline the importance of Rohingya’s ability to live safe, purposeful and dignified lives whilst they are in Bangladesh and support the efforts to prepare them for return to Myanmar, once conditions allow.”

The foreign missions in their joint statement

“We underline the importance of Rohingya’s ability to live safe, purposeful and dignified lives whilst they are in Bangladesh and support the efforts to prepare them for return to Myanmar, once conditions allow.”

Ambassador Naoki said the fundamental solution to the Rohingya crisis is to realize the repatriation of the Rohingya refugees to their homeland Myanmar.

“Japan will stand ready to cooperate with Bangladesh to this end. We commend the efforts of the government to start the repatriation early through the bilateral dialogue. I see the urgent need for early repatriation,” he mentioned.

Remarks by U.S. Embassy Dhaka’s Regional Refugee Coordinator Ms. Mackenzie Rowe at University of Dhaka’s Center for Genocide Studies Seminar on “Rohingya Crisis: The Pathways to Repatriation” as follow;

In 2017, as the genocide unfolded ( in Burma), Bangladesh showed us all the meaning of generosity, of compassion, and of a shared sense of humanity.When others closed their eyes—and borders—to victims of violence and persecution, Bangladeshis opened their doors. They welcomed a people in need.

Almost daily, we hear reports that the military is executing brutal violence against its own people since the grasp of an oppressive military junta that seized power during its February 2021 coup d’état.

Nearly 858,000 individuals have been displaced and more than 2,200 innocent civilians have been killed since the coup. We all know well that the current regime is composed of many of the same people who committed genocide against the Rohingya.

So, let’s be realistic. Conditions in Burma do not allow for a safe, voluntary, dignified, or sustainable return. Not today, and not in the near future.

Having acknowledged this fact, let us have an open and honest discussion about what we can do, right here and now. How can we support the dignity, the safety, and the well-being of the refugees Bangladesh is so generously hosting?

So, let’s be realistic. Conditions in Burma do not allow for a safe, voluntary, dignified, or sustainable return. Not today, and not in the near future. How can we support the dignity, the safety, and the well-being of the refugees Bangladesh is so generously hosting? As much as the Rohingya want to return home, they also want to live meaningful lives. They want to contribute to society. They want to give their children the tools to be able to do the same.

Remarks by U.S. Embassy Dhaka’s Regional Refugee Coordinator Ms. Mackenzie Rowe

As much as the Rohingya want to return home, they also want to live meaningful lives. They want to contribute to society.They want to give their children the tools to be able to do the same.

With that in mind, I see three elements to how we can move forward today:

We need to squarely address the current situation in Burma;
We must make the transition from an emergency response to a more sustainable one; and
We must change the conversation about Rohingya to one that is constructive and focused on solutions.
First, we need to be frank with ourselves about Burma.

This crisis started in Burma, and its solution is in Burma.

But, the Burmese authority strongly condemned the statements for the anniversary of the 2017 Genocide – Burmese authority called conflict- are not only unauthentic and based on unverified sources, but also include interference in Myanmar’s internal affairs.

In 2017, the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army ARSA terror group attacked 30 police outposts and a battalion headquarters at the same time in Rakhine State. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Myanmar Military Council said the security forces have taken necessary action in accordance with existing regulations for peace.

The Myanmar government and people do not recognize the term “Rohingya” and international statements not only cover up the activities of the ARSA group for the incident that occurred on August 25, 2017, but also ignore the positive actions taken by the Myanmar government.

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